Skip to main content

About your Search

20140705
20140713
SHOW
Today 9
News 8
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 47
CSPAN3 36
CSPAN2 34
MSNBCW 34
WPVI (ABC) 18
ALJAZAM 15
KGO (ABC) 12
KYW (CBS) 12
KPIX (CBS) 11
CNNW 10
KQED (PBS) 9
KNTV (NBC) 8
WRC (NBC) 8
WHYY (PBS) 6
WUVP (Univision) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 339
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 345 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the college of william and mary in virginia. the class is about an hour. >> we're going to talk about the seven years war. it is often known as the first global war. it is a war that in the united states is often called the french and indian war. beck, it is the war of conquest. it is the world conquest. the name is important. the civil war is one interpretation, but calling it the war of northern aggression means you have a different interpretation. uebec, the war of the conquest has a really heavy political implication because they see this as the moment french society was taken over, concorde by the british, and therefore, the moment -- conquered by the british, and therefore, the moment that you start to see them sees french canada with a long and brutal struggle for attending. -- autonomy. the name the french and indian war comes from the british themselves. this is who they are blaming, naming for the aggression. they do not put themselves to blame. they put the blame on the french. is itsn years' war, name in europe. a's ends with a space -- with peace treaty in 1873, but the w
of virginia's millet -- i served on the university of virginia miller center's panel that looked at these issues and i encourage you to look at those results, to meaning a broad-based conversation within your state on cost, quality and value. promoting experimentation we are hearing about in tennessee and vermont. investing in wellness. i know governor haslam you have a wellness institute you establish and have worked hard on. obviously, governor shumlin has done so much on the chronic care issue. we know 5% of our patients are driving half of our spending, almost all people with chronic illness. then, understanding technology and the key role he could play. again, from what appears to be a single, deep blue state, we have had an adverse -- a diverse experience of market innovation dallas with government involvement -- balanced with government involvement resulting in a dramatic drop in health care expenses and supported by the physician and health care leaders in massachusetts. thank you very much. >> thank you. bill. >> to i. i am bill rutherford -- thank you. i am bill rutherf
in attendance and watching online. the commission's role as the planning agency in the suburbs of virginia and maryland, we seek to protect and enhance the rich historic and cultural resources, which includes the parks. the planning commission recently celebrated 90 years since our organization was chartered by congress. that one of our early responsibilities involved to inquiring a property that has become fort circle parks. in terms of what we do, i would like to mention one project, one relevant to the national archives. we started work on the pennsylvania avenue initiative. the generalng with services administration and the national park service to study the near and long-term need for pennsylvania avenue between the white house and the capitol. we will develop a vision for which is homereet to so many national treasures, including this building. i want to send a thanks to the national parks service and recognize peter may. he is a fellow ncpc commissioner bud his day job is associate director for lands, resources, and planning. locals may recognize these names as parks, neighborhoods,
's role as the planning agency in the suburbs of virginia and maryland, we seek to protect and enhance the rich historic and cultural resources, which includes the parks. the planning commission recently celebrated 90 years since our organization was chartered by congress. that one of our early responsibilities involved to inquiring a property that has become fort circle parks. in terms of what we do, i would like to mention one project, one relevant to the national archives. we started work on the pennsylv
-generation schools. >> the forward of your book, getting smart, was written by a former west virginia governor. why was that? >> he was a great education governor. he has been an even better education advocate after leaving office area and both governor wise and governor jeb bush joined together in 2010 to , aate digital learning now forward leaning education policy platform for state leaders. both of those x governors have made a tremendous impact since leaving office, advocates for digital learning. >> what did governor wise do in west virginia? many digitald learning opportunities. we thought of it as distance learning. connecting career education to schools. created dual enrollment opportunities so kids could earn college credit opportunities in high school. since leaving, governor wise took over the alliance for education. he has been the most important advocate for great high schools, and college and career preparation for young people in america. >> is there a difference between how public schools and private k-12 schools are approaching digital learning? >> not really. you would think that
's flight facility in virginia. it is headed to the international space station on a cargo resupply mission. talk about a special anniversary of sorts, on mars, the rover, curiosity, jut celebrated one martian year on the red planet. how did it celebrate? with a selfie, of course. jennifer london reports. >> reporter: is the selfie from space seen around the world. the mars rover curiosity snapped this vanity shot to mark a major milestone: her one martian year anniversary which is longer than you may think, 687 earth days to be exact. >> it is wild. a mars day is 40 minutes longer than an earth day. the most efficient way is for her to operate on a mars day. >> look at her harrowing landing on mars. . >> confirmed. >> that was just the beginning of the rover's challenging journey of exploration. her mission, roam the red planet taking pictures -- yes, that includes selfies, digging for rocks and sending data to signits like joy crisp at nasa's jet prop pulse laboratory. >> she is an intrepid explorer. she is curious -- appropriate name -- so when she sees something interesting, she stops.
, virginia. they got on trains and were of riot in lynchburg on june 17. on june 18, came the battle of winter bird that didn't -- battle of lynchburg. hunter fled over the mountains to now west virginia. early thought about chasing him but they didn't but he took one look and it was clear this was big. he marched his man down the because- we mean north of the way the river flows. they marched down the valley. they were not very well supplied. a third of the man didn't have shoes. they waited two days along the route for a shipment of shoes. they got up to harpers ferry in martinsburg where the union , and otheral siegel union general, he was a political general. he was a german immigrant. had not verye that good experiences at newmarket on may 15 where he outnumbered the confederate troops and he lost. he was unofficially known as the flying dutchman. he fled martinsburg and harpers ferry when early forces came in and they had a nice fourth of july eating all the yankees food and drinking whatever beverages they found. the next day on july 5, they crossed over the potomac river. get
to severe storms and then a big cooldown for the middle of the week. it will be delightful. virginia, the weaerbug camera there. some storms rolled through earlier. notice the heavy downpours that rolled through. the flags flying in the wind. gusty wind associated with the storms so. things have dried off in virginia. on the beach, 77 degrees in ocean city, dewpoint of 72, certainly on the muggy side. by the high school, 88 degrees. it has dropped down to about 83. we had some orms earlier in parts of montgomery county. those have since diminished. we are now just watching a few storms north of the mason-dixon line and a few more storms along the i-80, nothing severe. in fact, just a little bit of lightning. still, if you are in the vicinity of any of those storms, make sure you get inside. we are one degree shy of 90 at reagan national, 91 and fredericksburg. look at these dew points. it feels pretty sticky when you step outside. frederick, 75 degrees, and a lot of that due to the moisture from rain showers we saw earlier. per between 5-15 miles hour, beginning to diminish a little
insurance plans. that's ultimately what was at case.in this host: philip from stafford, virginia, on our line for independence. .ood morning caller: good morning. of a comment for the american people. the supreme court taking up this issue when they take up limited number of cases, bigger problems. theave monsanto flooding market with, i guess, genetically modified food, we poverty, wee have have economic problems. i just feel like this is just a distraction. like to know what billionaire's funding your organization. it just seems like these billionaire fund these organizations for these trivial reals when we have problems. american people, wake up. host: you can give us some background on the beckett fund and where the group came from and where your funding comes from? guest: sure. fund was formed about 20 years ago. hassan was the founder. he was working in private practice here in washington, d.c., working on some religious freedom cases, and realized that what his --were where his real passion lied. so he decided to leave private and formed the beckett fund as a non-profit litigation
been delayed. it's scheduled to take off sunday from virginia. it is headed to the international space station on a cargo resupply mission. now, to a birthday, kind of a special benefit day, if you will, of sorts. the rover named "curiosity" completed year 1 on mars. how did she celebrate? jennifer london has a sneak peek. >> it's the selfie from spice seen around the world. the mars rover curiosity snapped this vanity shot to mark a major milestone, her one martian year anniversary which is longer than you may think. 687 earth days to be exact. it is wild. the mars day is 40 minutes longer than the earth day. and the most efficient way to get curiosity to do what we want her to do is for her to operate on a mars day. >> table a look back at hera land okay mars. that was just the beginning of the rover's challenging journey of exploration. her mission: ro ha m the red planet taking be pictures, selfi selfies, digging for rocks at nasa's jet-prop pulse laboratory. >> she is curious, very appropriate name. so when she sees something interesting, she stops. but then when she has figured
lockwood. she tried to get admitted in the commonwealth of virginia, and she was turned down. the supreme court of the united states turned down her complaint because of states rights. they took the position that it was not a privilege of a citizen of the united states protected by the 14th amendment. in other words, the virginia folks could discriminate against her. as you can tell, lockwood made a great start, and there was still a long way to go for equality for women, and i, too, attended a university that was totally lopsided with men where all of those awful putdowns of women took place, but thank heavens we are at a place now where i think most of that is forgotten. >> not forgotten. [laughter] >> it is either forgotten but not gone or gone but not forgotten. in any event read this book. you will like it. thank you. [applause] >> thank you so much. ok, the floor is now open to all of you from the audience for your questions and comments. when you ask a question, will you be good enough to identify yourself and just wait for the microphone to be brought to you? who would like to sta
in high demand occupations. the other states are illinois, minnesota, virginia, and wisconsin. the department of defense carried out a similar effort prior to this in which they identified 10 occupational areas that have high likelihood of having transferability between the skill sets gained in the military and the civilian workforce. we were asked to choose from that list of 10 occupational areas to focus on in this areas, andur or five the states were asked to choose three occupational areas as part of that. the states are focusing on commercials drivers licenses, bus drivers and truck drivers. the emergency medical technician and paramedics, licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, physical therapy assistants, and police patrol officers. those are the occupational areas. asked to focus on an area where they saw growth or need in their state and where there was likelihood to be employment. the state teams that were appointed by the governor's in the states are working to remove red tape, any duplication across , to reduce unemployment of veterans, to increase the post s
people in virginia started to think, hey, maybe we want to be with the winner too. in south carolina, they figured they were not going to be the winner so they were looking to get on the other side. i suspect a lot like that was happening in the soviet union as gorbachev is wrestling with the reforms that he wants to put in place. obviously, we know that the coup attempt had an impact on the relationship that gorbachev had with not only the soviet union, but with russia. that was an undercurrent, along with the time that gorbachev was bringing his view of reform to the people of the soviet union and to the countries. satellite countries were definitely trying to decide who is the winner. there was a dynamic there that i think president bush managed better than historian technology -- then historians acknowledge. he was cognizant of the ease germans and the czechoslovakian's and the balkans. he was cognizant to what their challenges were as they try to deal with the unsettled relationships that they had either like or not like. -- liked or not liked. who is the winner going to be? do
to be talking about the economy again on tuesday in northern virginia and do some fundraising in new york. so i think both sides are sort of eyeing that and testing out their messages, and everything has to be looked in that prism. >> david nakamura, thanks, david. >>> it's taller than niagara falls. it's a water slide that you have to see to believe. we'll talk about the serious problems engineers faced making it happening. covergirl clump crusher. big green brush, curved to crush. load on the volume and the curve hugs your lashes tight, destroying every clump in its way. 200% more volume. zero clumps. so be fearless! and crush those clumps. clump crusher from easy, breezy, beautiful, covergirl. take the challenge! from easy, breezy, beautiful, covergirl. c'mon, you want heartburn? when your favorite food starts a fight, fight back fast, with tums. heartburn relief that neutralizes acid on contact. and goes to work in seconds. ♪ tum, tum tum tum... tums! >>> it is time for your fast five headlines. it was a rare public appearance for cuba's fidel castro. he met with russian president vladimi
. little information on talent. let's start with a job, a welder. in virginia, over the last year, there were 1100 jobs posted to hire welders as defined by the standard job classification system. that is a healthy number. be grossly understates the demand for talent in welding third our research partner identified that in the same year, there were 1100 and two anotherjobs posted and 3300 postings that required welding talent. the landscape for jobs in welding looks much different when you look at talent needs rather than just job titles. consider in other job, computer programer. most use a single classification for computer programmer. hardly anyone hires just a computer programmer these days. instead, they are looking for system administrators, network vaministrators, ja programmers or other skills and competencies related to computer technology. imagine the competitive edge you you had analytics producing real-time information on the skills and competencies that are in demand. another thing you could do with the up-to-date talent information is assessed the degree at which you
branches with the virginia hamilton, walter myers, that previous generations and previous decades did not have access to. we really thought back then that the world was going to change. walter myers in 1986 wrote an essay that said we are going to change the industry. since then the industry has changed but in many ways not as fast or as strongly or comprehensively as many of us would like. >> good morning. i am the ceo. the world of publishing. i sort of stumbled into the world of publishing in the 90s because african-american fiction books had taken this country by storm and publishers did not understand how to market and promote these books and my company, literary media publishing consultants was created. we did a lot of work in that area and was so fascinating to be on the cusp of all the wonderful authors and most were no long serbian published. terry mcmillan was at the top of the food shane making people understand reading, there was a joy in reading. subsequently as the publishing industry developed, fiction books especially for women i started to see a void in the world of c
of virginia. his name is lynn would colton. the father of his wife and his pals and civil rights in virginia as a republican. much more supportive of civil rights than they are today. one last book, really interesting history but my wife gave me for christmas by a professor and still kristine no called strom thurmond america which is an interesting story of race. seven baht to exploit. >> your summer reading list. posted to our facebook page or send us an e-mail. >> this week book tv takes a look at the weekly standard, an online bookshelf. on the shelf this week, the digital revolution. >> what are you reading this summer? >> you know, used to think that i needed to read one book at a time. eventually as i have gotten all that i am reading multiple books at the same time. i have a number of books on my nightstand one of which have almost done with some one of which i am in the middle command one of which is next up the book am almost done with this public about a world war one. it is an amazing book. it is not a new book, but my daughter is studied abroad recommended it to me. it is a fasci
but your auto is still registered in let's say virginia if said driver has been living on your block for lets say a few years with out of state plates, while you are still paying registration fees through your nose and yout tired of it there is something you can do the state of california back in 2004 created a cheaters website where you can report registration cheaters so far the state has collected over 9 million dollars in fees simply because ordinary citizens tired of registration cheaters have log on anonymously and helped out now i expect to get nasty grams from viewers saying i am asking people to report their fellow citizen, but i'll tell you this, the next time you get your registration renewal in the mailthe way i see it is if i gotta pay my registration fees everyone should too buty the driver with the south carolina plates got a fix it ticket which gives hims 60 days to get the car registered . in oakland stanley roberts kron 4 news a rohnert park teen is facing 54 -counts of fraud and identity theft. 19-year-old mohannad halaweh. was arrested last month, after authoritie
the story of a small town virginia furniture maker who successfully be fought to safe his company and hundreds of jobs from chinese competition. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> next, charles kurzman, author of "the missing martyrs," questions why in light of continued anger over u.s. foreign policy on the part of young muslims around the world recruitment levels for terrorist organizations have gone down since 9/11. he was interviewed about the topic on the campus of the university of north carolina at chapel hill for booktv's college series. >> host: well, booktv is on location at the university of north carolina in chapel hill where we're interviewing some professors who are also authors. joining us now is charles kurzman. his most recent book is "the missing martyrs: why there are so few muslim terrorists." professor kurzman, you write in your book: the bad news for americans is this: islamist terrorists really are out
's broad ideological line but lives in richmond, virginia, an area that does not have a very large jewish community. you're looking for a unicorn. for the party to go back to where it was it would need to be competitive in places like the suburbs of new york city, places that have substantial jewish populations where you might find a moderate republican candidate. >> i also don't think the policies put forth from those there even for the nonjewish democrats that are there are necessarily not in line with what a jewish republican running for congressman -- >> there was a contingent of jewish republicans that were concentrated among neoconservatives and that wing of the party is so descended at this point that the influence of that wing i think even has waned. i think that is where at least a substantial number in the modern era because these were former democrats for the most part on that particular policy and that wing of the party is not exactly running things at the moment. >> no they're not. on the other side of this break we'll tackle the most talked about story of the week and it's a
: let's go to pam, our last segment, from virginia beach, virginia, on the line for democrats. morning.ood i just want to say i have been listening to this and i don't sonk i've ever been disappointed in comments from people as i am this morning. one issueonflating with something entirely different. borders tomorrow anyonee no money to not, our government still adequately would care for, because of political issues, to adequatelying take care of our children here. to aidhem giving money countriesle in other and people are saying well taking away from our kids, it's not. no matter what you do, the republican party, they're not to release money to help our citizens anyway. the makeup of that party. there's always going to be a reason. when they can afford to spen spend $24 billion to shut down our government, when they're suing the president and they whenthe money to do that, they have blocked healthcare getome times, these people and there's0 a year 535 of them. there's money there. just they don't want to -- it's their ideology. people are confusing that by have money tot take care of
." it was compared to "behind the beautiful forevers" and it is about a furniture factory run by a family in virginia but an absolute page turner. >> can i ask, are you seeing a downturn of actual book sales so people can read these books on e-readers? is that significant? during the summer might it uptick because there are those including me who love to get a book and just open it up in the summer even if it gets suntan oil on it and pieces of sand in pages? there's something about that. >> an excellent question. we saw for the past few years ebooks were just rising and people had just gotten their devices and wanted to try them out and loaded them up and now they've stabilized. it's still a significant growth area for the whole industry, but, you know, print is still strong as well. it's not taking over print as quickly as it was before. >> okay. nice to speak with you. thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> that is a wrap of this hour of "weekends with alex witt" be sure to join me for a two-hour edition at noon eastern today. straight ahead jonathan capehart guest hosts "up with steve kornac
. >> heavy rains and winds swept through virginia and left thousands without power and in the pacific northwest people are keeping an eye on dangerous wild fires that are burning out of control. >> reporter: thousands of people in the mid-atlantic states are struggling to recover from severe weather that pounded the region with rain and major flooding. >> people are running and taking shelter and stuff. >> the winds howling at 70 miles per hour. >> the wind literally came this way and pushed them across the street. >> it's inundation was severe at pennsylvania's hershey park enough water for people to float around and north harbor park was submerged as 3 inches of rain fell in 2 hours. at virginia beach 11 people were vured as the wind shredded homes and businesses, tossing this man's car like a toy. >> everything was just flying around and out west more of nature's fury, a wild fire in northwest washington state is burning out of control. fueled by strong winds and warm conditions. >> this is too close to home, it's been scary. >> the fire has burned an estimated 18,000 acres already
virginia. miss worku found her sister dead on the floor. she ate dinner with her sister the night before, watched tv, then they went to separate bedrooms to go to sleep. the next morning she found her sister strangled to death. >> please find my sister killer. please. i'm begging you guys. >> asabech moved from ethiopia nine years ago. she worked at this restaurant as a cook for five years. she had no kids and was not n her death, call alexandria police. >>> and we're following a developing story overseas for you right now. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says his country will continue to defend itself from militants in the gaza strip. the gaza health ministry says more than 120 people in gaza have been killed. israel launched air strikes five days ago in response to rocket fire coming from gaza. >>> and palestinians in gaza are asking the united nations for a resolution urging for a ceasefire. the resolution does not mention hamas firing rockets into israel. most council members back the palestinians. >>> the cdc is doing damage control this morning. it's placed a stop on the
, welcome. >> thank you. our other witnesses, we have honorable irene m. kheily from west virginia, clarksburg, west virginia, a u.s. district judge. she received her undergraduate degree from the college of maryland in baltimore and she received her law degree at the university of alabama. before attending law school, she was employed as a secondary education teacher. she received her juris doctorate from western virginia college of law. we welcome you, judge. from 1980 to 1992, she practiced law with the firm of steptoe & johnson. was that here in washington? >> no, that was in west virginia. >> so they're originally a west virginia firm. >> yes. >> thank you. she was appointed judge of the united states district court for the western district of virginia from president george bush in 1992. she served as chief judge from march 2001 to march 2008. currently she serves as chair of the criminal law committee at the judicial conference of the united states. we welcome you. our next witness is the honorable patty saris, who is no stranger to this committee, and we welcome you back aga
] [ male announcer ] hold on. it's manwich. >>> after the 2010 census, it was time to redraw virginia's congressional map. republicans wanted to give eric cantor an edge. packing more republican voters into his district. then the house's number two republican would be in an even safer ticket. great idea, right? not exactly. as you know, despite republicans' best efforts to pick their constituents to suit their agenda, the voters actually had ideas of their own. they decided cantor wasn't conservative enough and last month they tossed him out of office picking a little known tea party college professor, dave brat. gerrymandering, redrawing a district to shape election outcomes, was a big flop for cantor. but you can see why he tried it. brazen political redistricting has helped the gop keep control of the house. this is important. regardless of what voters might prefer in many parts of the country. you wouldn't know it from looking at the house today, but it was actually democrats who got 470,000 more votes than republicans in 2012 house races. yet republicans didn't just eke out a maj
winds and rain swept through virginia and thousands are without power. and in the west dangerous wild fires continue to burn out of control. >> thousands of people in the mid-atlantic states are struggling to recover from severe weather that pounded the region with rain and major flooding. >> people are running and taking shelter and stuff. >> the winds howling at 70 miles per hour. >> the wind came this way and pushed them across the street. >> the inundation was severe at pennsylvania's hershey park enough water for people to throat around and north harbor park also submerged as more than 3 inches of rain fell in two hours. in virginia beach, 11 people were injured as the winds shredded homes and businesses and tossed this man's car like a toy. >> like a spin cycle with everything flying around. >> and out west, a wild fire is burning out of control fed by strong winds and dry conditions. >> this is too close to home. this is scary. >> the fire has burned an estimate 18,000 acres already as more than 450 firefighters scramble to contain it and neighborhood evacuations are mandated.
is looking for answers in her sister's murder in northern virginia. she tells news4 she found her younger sister dead inside their two-bedroom apartment on derby court on july 4th. she ate dinner with her 43-year-old sister the night before, watching tv, and then went to their separate bedrooms to sleep. the next morning she says she found her sister strangled to death. >> please find my sister killer. please. i'm begging you guys. >> she moved to alexandria from ethiopia nine years ago. she worked at this restaurant for five years as a cook. she had no kids and she was not married. if you have any information in her death, call alexandria police. >>> and right now we're following a developing story overseas. benjamin netanyahu says his country will continue to defend itself itself. more than 120 people in gaza have been killed. israel launched air strikes in respond to rocket fire coming from gaza. palestinians in gaza are requesting the united nations for a ceasefire. they're asking for immediate ceasefire. it does not mention hamas firing into israel. most other council members back th
in virginia when an illegal immigrant who had been arrested a couple times was released. ended up smashing drunk driving killing a benedict nun. still not deported. >> the question in that situation though, the government knew he was illegal and didn't deport him. his blood alcohol level when he killed her son was .24%. that is way over the legal limit. and they knew he was an illegal. didn't deport him and didn't prosecute. >> he drove 35 miles, as clayton said, 35 miles the wrong way onative hoovment police were pursuing him at one point rammed his vehicle. he went right around the police car and wound up killing this cop in a head-on collision. >> and now there are reports that the ms 13. one of the most violent drug gangs is now going into these reshelters where the illegals are staying in texas and various places in the country and recruiting these illegal immigrants to sell drugs in their gangs. >> and it's, of course, already if you live in any city in america, you know that ms 13, which is originally he will value doran street gang has become a major source of crime and disorder in
people were hurt as heavy rains and winds swept through virginia and left thousands of people without power. and now authorities are keeping an eye on dangerous wild fires in west. >>> thousands of people in the mid atlanticic states are struggling to recover from weather that pounded the region with rain and flooding. the winds howling at 70 miles per hour. >> the wind came there way and pushed them across the street. >> the inundation was severe at pennsylvania's hershey park, enough water for people to float around. and more than 3 inches of rain fell in only two hours. in virginia beach, 11 people were injured as wind shredded homes and businesses, tossing this man's car like a toy. >> it's a spin cycle, and out west, more of nature's fury in southwest washington state is burning out of control, fueled by strong winds and dry conditions. it's crazy, this is too close to home. it's scare. >> i the fire burned 13,000 acres already as 450 firefighters scramble to contain it and mandatory evacuations are happening. ray spray aid home on his roof. >> we start to get embers we turn that
of information act. we found possible cases by the hundreds in d.c., virginia, and maryland. and not just by car thieves. >> common sense tells you that more desperate people means more desperate numbers to get themselves out of trouble. >> reporter: a surge of arsons by car owners driven by need or by greed in a bad economy since a spo -- says a spokesperson for insurance companies. we found dozens of them in fairfax county. hundreds more cases of potential vehicle insurance fraud uncovered by the i-team in d.c. in 2013 and 2014. but most eye catching, what we found in maryland where the state's insurance investigators report more than 2,000 cases of potential vehicle insurance fraud in 2013. but investigators say it's a very difficult crime to prove and to prosecute. >> most of the time we can find the origin and the cause. the hard part is finding out who did it. >> reporter: the news4 i-team wanted to find out why. so we brought our cameras here and watched as firefighters set fire to this old ford and found in less than 60 seconds, a small spark turned into a raging inferno. investigators s
and virginia with action in several others. we asked about the advantages of embedding entrepreneurs in government. >> entrepreneurship is an incredibly important part to dell. we say we need your assistance not just in us doing our business but helping us communicate with government. after listening to the entrepreneurs was to launch a campaign for entrepreneurs in residence in agencies across the country. it allows an entrepreneurial seat at the table when decisions are being made at a particular agency. but more importantly it also allows that entrepreneur to serve as an advocate for other entrepreneurs trying to break through the red tape of state bureaucracies to take advantage of the many programs that may exist but they just don't have time or the resources to access. >> what about the argument that to be fair maybe the state agencies ought to be adding consumer positions as well, and is this an entrepreneur to cut through the red tape that is there in the first place. >> reporter: that is actually anent point. the revenue for the resident , it's one thing for a government age
asia and full of vigor and i was stationed in virginia and there were 2,000 women that needed pap smears. when i left there were 2,000 women on the list and i ran into an enertia and you have hit the nail on the head. it is the backlog we can take care of. number two changing the culture of the va is difficult and that is more critical downstream from years. what you did at the va was recognized a problem. saw you long wait times and wanted to make sure the patients in need got there. i have seen those patients in my office. you said how much work are we actually doing and when you evaluated it you found out your colleagues were seeing basically six patients a day. there is no private practice in the world doing anything that can stay afloat seeing six patients a day. increase productivity and wait time and 60% of people that sought out care, and we know there is a shortage of your specialty in the va and in the country quite frankly, wouldn't come back. i found that amazing to me they found the environment so unhospit unhospitalable they refused to come back. and how we are all b
outcome. >> we are out of time. thank you very much. >> i will recognize the gentleman from virginia. 5 minutes. >> thank you, dr. woodcock, as others are have said today and also what i have heard in the informal conversations that you not only do a good job as a witness, but you are doing a good job overall. so, i appreciate that. thank you so much for being here today. i will tell you, you and doctor had a conversation about lawyers. some lawyers are always nervous, other lawyers are always looking for a way to find a way to solve the problem and so maybe we need to get some of those lawyers on your team and the corporate teams and solve a problem and figure out how to make these things work. i do think it's important. as you probably know, i'm one of those that advocates that we try to move a little quicker in those areas that we have problems that we don't have solutions for currently and also, favor what is known in some states and state laws is right to trial when you have a situation where doctors have tried everything and folks are given a diagnosis they have months to live. i'
liberty university to provide content to prisoners within the virginia system. there is a great bipartisan movement across the country to provide more of these very tangible services to those who are incarcerated to help reduce recidivism when they get out. >> have those programs been studied to ascertain whether those are effective? >> theron going because the program is relatively new. anecdotally, we have studies that show they work. we would urge they continue to be fully funded. >> what about programs like unicor? >> unicor also provides tangible skills to those incarcerated that translates to job opportunities when they get out. if there is a certification for those incarcerated, then those are very portable skills used on the outside. >> now, that pays for itself; is that right? >> absolutely, it does. >> and the recidivism rate for those who have had the opportunity to get into unicor? how has that compared to the general recidivism rate? >> i can't give you a specific figure, but absolutely lower, congressman. it makes common sense that when you have a skill and you can get a job,
. ith that i would like to recognize representative virginia foxx. you won't often hear me say "amen" to something george miller says, but this time i want to say amen because i think his comments are right on. all the comments have been, and i wanted to add mine to that. the speaker pointed out in the leadership meeting the other day this is something that came to his attention 27 years ago. it came to my attention 27 years ago when i was a community college president, and i've been interested in this issue in consolidating workforce development programs and making sure we bring accountability to the programs so that the money that's being spent going directly to services for people who need to develop skills for the jobs that are currently available. and everyone has touched on that. but i also want to emphasize the fact that nothing around here gets done without a lot of collaboration and cooperation, and particularly the hard work of the staff. we get the credit, they get to do a lot more work. i want to particularly acknowledge the staff of our committees for working on this, an
for introducing my united states attorney who has ben in virginia the past several years and someone who is very interested not only enforcement of law but public policy so i am delighted to have him here today to testify. >> with several other witnesses from west virginia , u.s. district judge receiving new dame. and before attending. [laughter] before attending law school employed as the secondary education teacher and we welcome you. and. >> it is from west virginia. >> okay. thank you. george h. w. bush 1982 and served as chief judge march 2001 through march march 2008 and she serves as chair of the prologue committee. welcome. next is honorable on dash who is no stranger to this committee and we welcome you back again serving as chair to the psittacine commission serving as the district judge for massachusetts since 1994 having been nominated for president clinton and with the district court surveying as the massachusetts superior court in been served as a federal magistrate judge. and serving as staff counsel tuz said judiciary also serving as a law clerk to the late justice potter of mass
virginia teresa was told to leave police headquarters. she left everything behind including her purse. >> it was very fast. sitting there and the sirens went off. and then you see everybody say evacuate so it was fast. >>reporter: at least 200 employee also evacuated after some one noticed a foul odor. >> one of our lieutenant on the second floor smelled the foul smell and pulled the alarm and notified everybody to evacuate the building. >>reporter: fire crew arrive with the hazmat team all suited up. went through the entire 9 story be. at first they were looking for possible gas leak but quickly realize the smell was coming from the h vachl city. air conditioning collat collator arrived. no public services were ever disrupted. >> 911 dispatch center not located here at 4 5 5 7 street. not affecting the call for service. for the officers on the street. >>reporter: people who came to do any kind of business could not get in. police closed off the surrounding area. >> trying to get back to my office on fourth and broadway. i captain. >>reporter: alameda couldn't superior cour
not behaving badly all unless you live in the state. but your auto is in state virginia a. with the driver been living on the block for a few months without state plates will you pay registry fees and you tired of it there is something you can do. the state of california back in 2004 created a wheat website you report registration cheaters. 9000 these simply because ordinary citizens tired registration cheaters all done now leslie help out. i hope they get i like it now seagrams from this i'll tell you this next time you get your registration and a male thing about that. when i see it if i to him aerostation fees everyone does. by lai driver got a fix the ticket which hit gives them 60 days to a car registered. if you want to help the state report registration treaters seeking a kron 4 kron4-dot- com but look for people behaving badly tap on the main page >> : this is a false gesture from a landlord 98 year-old woman fighting eviction tonight urban green development company that runs the building that maryville's lived in says it previously offered her a deal to stay in her apartment dan report
. >> the national weather service says a weak tornado touched down in virginia beach yesterday. hit the tornado oceanfront area, even knocking a steeple off the roof. a dozen people were hurt. oakley, much calmer than yesterday. meteorologist steve rudin has the forecast. >> a nice break this evening, skies have cleared nicely. may have patchy faulk in the morning, but nothing that will bring travel delays. temperature today, from the belfort furniture weather center, 85 dulles, 89 at reagan national airport. the temperature has cooled a bit, 70's dulles and gaithersburg, 79 degrees at the airport downtown, reagan national. it is cleare radar, and drive from the delmarva beaches to the mountains. through the coming days, the focus will be across the upper midwest as the core of cold air moves our way. we will talk about the impact across the mid-atlantic and the potential for stronger storms early next week in just a few minutes. prince george's county police returned to the scene of a home invasion and shooting. they passed out fliers and spoke with homeowners. they're looking for information
decided to leave. >> the national weather service says a weak tornado did hit the virginia coast yesterday. winds got up to 75 miles per hour. 12 people were hurt in the storm. it damaged homes and businesses. >> after a wild weather week we are ending with a beautiful full moon tonight. >> it's called a buck moon. it's also a super moon. do you know what that means. >> it might go on forever. >> i'm trying to show you i looked up stuff on the internet. believe it or not, 14% bigger and 33% brighter than it normally is. how about that? a nice shot out there tonight. this is from right here in d.c. it was beautiful and still is. the actual full moon will occur tomorrow morning. simply gorgeous. currently in the 70s. 79 degrees with winds from the south. we have clouds out there. again, a very nice start to the evening hours. a nice start to the weekend. 72 in fredricksburg. warm and muggy. we may see areas of fog overnight. don't be surprised about that tomorrow morning. one thing we will not see is rain on the radar or into the day tomorrow. one or two showers developeded. we have been on
virginia beach en el estado de virginia, en varios hoteles las ventanas se reventaron, ni el campanario de una iglesia resistiÓ. >>> parte del verano serÁ un verano frÍo en gran parte del centro de estados unidos que tan pronto como la prÓxima semana podrÍan ver caer las temperaturas a cifras rÉcord, vemos cuanto durarÁ la onda helada y quÉ Áreas va a afectar. >>> es tiempo de calor intenso en la mayor parte del paÍs, agua y sol la combinaciÓn perfecta, la prÓxima semana podrÍa cambiar drÁsticamente una onda de aire frÍo se dirige al Área de los grandes lagos en pleno verano trayendo temperaturas frÍas para diez ciudades del paÍs, mÁximas entre 40 y 60 grados para ciudades como kansas city, mineapolis, cleveland y chicago. >>> lo que vemos no es un vortice polar, mÁs bien amplificaciÓn en la corriente en chorro que permite que aire mÁs frÍo sobre el golfo de alaska invade los estados unidos. >>> residentes de la ciudad de los vientos no han podido guardar la ropa de invierno y no estÁn contentos con la madre naturaleza. >>> es una locura, un dÍa caliente, otro dÍa
't, it could cost thousands of jobs. newshour's quinn bowman traveled to west virginia, where he looked in on one project dependent on the funds, and talked to west virginians who could be affected. >> we're in logan, west virginia, this project is part of route ten relocation and it allows the traveling public to go from man to logan. it's about ten millions cubic yards of excavation and contract wise its about $75-million. >> reporter: gary taylor's company, bizzack construction, is part of the team turning this winding, two-lane road into a new one double in size. much of the money for this and projects like it nationwide comes from the federal highway trust fund. it was created in 1956 to finance and maintain the federal highway system, and relies on a gasoline tax, now pegged at 18.4 cents a gallon. the revenue goes to reimburse states, which in turn, pay companies like bizzack for construction and maintenance. but the fund has been spending more than it takes in for years, as inflation eats away at the value of the tax, and increased fuel efficiency reduces gasoline usage. the mon
rains. and in virginia beach, winds up to 70 miles an hour. even a tornado, which lifted travis prezko's car off the ground. >> it was like a spin cycle. everything in my car, just flying around. >> reporter: if that wasn't enough, a church steeple fell. just missing his car. then there was lightning. 165,000 hits yesterday. and some close calls this week for people who thought they were safe. watch this, outside denver. >> time for hail. i think. >> reporter: a man standing in his garage with the door open. he suffered a concussion. >> i thought i was safe. >> reporter: in atlanta, a 7-year-old suffered burns. he and his mother slammed backward by a strike that came inside their house. >> all i could see was my son on the ground. his foot was smoking. >> reporter: here and near denver, the same lesson. stay away from doors and windows during a lightning storm. the electricity can enter your home. which is why you should stay off the landline phone, or handle appliance cords, and avoid plumbing, washing, or showering. because the lightning can travel along pipes. simple safety steps th
district of virginia for the past several years and he is someone who is very interested in not only the enforcement of the law but in criminal law and publish policy so i am delighted to have him here to testify and tim welcome. >> thank you. our other witnesses. we have irene keeley from west virginia. u.s. district judge. received her under graduate from the college of notre dame in baltimore and her masters from west virginia who is playing university of alabama in their first game. before attending gloscow she was employed as a second education teacher and received her doctor degree from west virginia college of law. we welcome you, judge. from 1980-1992 she practiced law with the firm step and johnson. was that here in washington? >> it was in the original office in west virginia. >> so they are a west virginia originally. thank you. she was appointed district judge in 1992 and served from march 2011-2008. she currently is chair of the committee of law for the united states. patty saris is the next witness and she is no stranger to the committee and we welcome you back again. s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 345 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)